New volunteer – Phoebe Jones

UCSF Archives volunteer Phoebe Jones

UCSF Archives volunteer Phoebe Jones

The archives team is happy to introduce our newest volunteer, Phoebe Jones. During the fall semester Phoebe will be learning the basics of archival work and will become familiar with diverse aspects of librarianship, including cataloging, arrangement, processing and digitization. She will assist with processing smaller collections, in particular, the records of the UCSF Committee on Arts & Lectures. Phoebe will also help with the collection survey and research for the upcoming exhibit.

Phoebe Jones recently graduated from Earlham College, a Quaker affiliated, liberal arts school in Richmond, Indiana, where she received a Bachelor of Arts degree in Religion. Phoebe graduated Phi Beta Kappa and with College Honors. She hopes to return to school in the near future.

Originally from Southern California Phoebe has enjoyed spending the past few years living in the Midwest and studying abroad in Northern India. Today, she can often be found on the wrong MUNI train with her head stuck in a good book.

Phoebe looks forward to working with the collection survey project and biographical files collection. She is very excited to learn about the exhibit research and design process and archiving processes so that she may one day handle sacred texts and manuscripts with an informed understanding of their preservation and archival history.

Accessions & Additions – Summer Edition

We’re always busy accepting new collections and pushing through our backlog to make as many collections available for research as possible. This list of new records includes materials relating to tobacco control, UCSF, infectious disease, pediatrics, nursing education, HIV/AIDS Toland Hall murals, book collecting, medical education, and more. Click on the titles below to learn more the contents, subjects, and size of these collections.

Contact us if you have any questions or would like to learn more. And please don’t hesitate to make an appointment to come in and use the collections!

Our catalog updates over the past six months:

The following collections have inventories or finding aids on the Online Archive of California:

Lecture now online – History, Science, and Art of Ocular Prosthetics

The lecture History, Science, and Art of Ocular Prosthetics given by Robert S. Sherins, MD, in the UCSF Library on May 28th is now available free online.

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This lecture, and the current exhibition on the fifth floor of the library, feature the Danz ocular pathology collection. The beautiful collection of glass eyes was exhibited several times during the past 50 years, however many historic details about this donation were lost. This unique artifact is used to tell the story of family traditions continued through the centuries on two continents. Through partnership with several members of the Danz family – ocularists: Phillip Danz of Sacramento; William Danz of San Francisco; and William Randy Danz of Ridgewood, New Jersey; as well as the author/lecturer, Dr. Robert Sherins, ophthalmologist, UCSF School of Medicine Alumnus Class of 1963; and UCSF archivist, Polina Ilieva, this exhibit demonstrates the evolution of skillful craftsmanship of Müller-Uri and Danz families, as well as the science and art of ocular prosthetics.

Please use this link to view Dr. Sherin’s presentation in full. More information about the story of the Danz collection can be found here.

About the UCSF Archives & Special Collections Lecture Series
UCSF Archives & Special Collections launched this lecture series to introduce a wider community to treasures and collections from its holdings, to provide an opportunity for researchers to discuss how they use this material, and to celebrate clinicians, scientists, and health care professionals who donated their papers to the archives.

May Video Capsule at Bay Area Video Coalition

This is the second year we’ll be participating in this event to celebrate local audiovisual treasures. The breadth of last year’s showing was immense– so many facets of Bay Area history were represented. This year we’re contributing a couple of clips from the UCSF School of Pharmacy of the 1960s.

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Join Bay Area Video Coalition (BAVC) Preservation program staff for an evening of audiovisual preservation revelry. Anchored by recent selections from BAVC’s Preservation Access Program* (PAP), tonight’s program includes archivist favorites, unexpected gems, and rarely seen treats from artist-and arts organization-participants in PAP, as well as from other Bay Area preservation organizations— including Stanford Media Preservation Lab, Internet Archive, Oddball Films, UCSF Archives, the GLBT Historical Society and California Audiovisual Preservation Project. We look forward to sharing recent and prized preservation work for what is sure to be a congenial celebration of archival craft and our media legacy.

When: May 14, 2015 | 7PM |

Where: BAVC | 2727 Mariposa St., 2nd Flr. San Francisco, CA 94110

Admission: $10 suggested donation. Let us know you’re coming. RSVP here!

We hope to see you there! And if you’d like to see what we screened last year, click over to the Internet Archive to see UCSF’s moving memento films from the 1930s.

Professor of Prosthodontia photographs, early 1900s

William Fuller Sharp, DMD, DDS, was the first alumni of the Dental Department of the Affiliated Colleges of the University of California (later UCSF School of Dentistry) to be placed on the faculty– where he remained for over fifty years. Sharp joined the school as an instructor in 1894, later becoming Professor of Mechanical Dentistry in 1899, Professor of Prosthetic Dentistry, Professor of Clinical Prosthodontia, and Professor of Prosthodontia, Emeritus in 1921. Sharp served as Acting Dean from 1926-1927 while Guy S. Millberry was on leave.

WF Sharp, Photograph Collection

WF Sharp, Photograph collection, undated

Above, Sharp with dental prostheses, undated.

WF Sharp, Photograph collection, 1906

WF Sharp’s office, operating room, April 18, 1906.

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WF Sharp, Photograph collection, 1906

Sharp in his office, April 18, 1906.

Happy National Library Week!

In observance of this lovely celebratory week, we bring you a few images of UCSF Library staff and librarians in their natural habitat from the 1950s.

 

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Photograph collection, Medical Sciences Building – The Library

Above, the entrance way to the old UCSF Library, in the Medical Sciences building, in 1959. Check out our previous post that expands a bit on the history of that library.

 

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Photograph collection, Medical Sciences Building – The Library

Tidying the current periodicals section in the 1950s.

 

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Photograph collection, Medical Sciences Building – The Library

Librarians of the Catalog Department (note card catalogs in the background) in the fall of 1958.

 

Lecture now online – The Forgotten Epidemic: HIV/AIDS in Women and Children

The lecture The Forgotten Epidemic: HIV/AIDS in Women and Children given by Dr. Arthur Ammann in the UCSF Library on February 26th is now available free online.

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Beginning in 1981 researchers at UCSF defined some of the most important features of the emerging AIDS epidemic – the cause of AIDS, the clinical features of AIDS, populations at risk for HIV infection, methods to prevent and treat HIV, and discovery of HIV. Working closely with community activists, advocates, scientists and policy makers, UCSF distinguished itself as a model of successful collaboration. The first discovery of AIDS in infants and children and blood transfusion associated AIDS at UCSF were instrumental in defining the extent of the epidemic. The scientific advances in HIV/AIDS that occurred over the next two decades were remarkable resulting in the near eradication of HIV in infants in the US and transforming an acute and fatal infection in adults to a chronic and manageable one. But even as these advances occurred benefiting many millions of people worldwide, women and children were too often excluded, resulting in a global epidemic that is now composed of over 50% women and children and a secondary epidemic of AIDS-related orphans that numbers in the tens of millions.

Please use this link to view Dr. Ammann’s presentation in full.

About the UCSF Archives & Special Collections Lecture Series
UCSF Archives & Special Collections launched this lecture series to introduce a wider community to treasures and collections from its holdings, to provide an opportunity for researchers to discuss how they use this material, and to celebrate clinicians, scientists, and health care professionals who donated their papers to the archives.

Collections in the Media

We’re proud to tell you about two new documentaries that used material from our collections and are hitting screens big and small near you.

Ken Burns’ new 3-part documentary, Cancer: The Emperor of All Maladies, premieres on PBS tonight, March 30. The film “examines cancer with a cellular biologist’s precision, a historian’s perspective and a biographer’s passion. The series artfully weaves three different films in one: a riveting historical documentary; an engrossing and intimate vérité film; and a scientific and investigative report.” It’s based on the book written by physician and oncologist Siddhartha Mukherjee and published in 2010, described as a “biography of cancer.”

[Note for UCSF Library fans: Mukherjee is married to Sarah Sze, the artist who created the mirror polished stainless steel sculpture in the front stairwell of the Parnassus library.]

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The film Merchants of Doubt, by the filmmakers of Food, Inc., is now playing in theaters in San Francisco (and elsewhere). It’s “the troubling story of how a cadre of influential scientists have clouded public understanding of scientific facts to advance a political and economic agenda.” The team was on-site for several days, interviewing UCSF Professor Stan Glantz in our reading room and filming in the vault.

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Let us know if you’re able to see either film! What did you think?

And, of course, contact us anytime via our online contact form to submit a question or comment. You can also email us directly at libraryarchives@ucsf.edu.

Chemistry labs of Barlet

Among the many jewels of our rare book collection is Annibal Barlet’s work of 1657 Le vray et methodique cours de la physique resolutive, vulgairements dite chymie

The volume has been rebound in vellum. It is 626 pages with a woodcut frontispiece and contains 37 full-page woodcuts illustrating the diverse operations of alchemical processes in detail.

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Barlet, Annibal, Le vray et methodique cours de la physique resolutive, vulgairements dite chymie, 1657

Woodcuts depict various chemical apparatus and operations of a laboratory in the mid 17th century. Barlet gives accounts of instruments, vessels, processes, minerals, and recipes.

Barlet, Annibal, Le vray et methodique cours de la physique resolutive, vulgairements dite chymie, 1657

Barlet, Annibal, Le vray et methodique cours de la physique resolutive, vulgairements dite chymie, 1657

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Barlet, Annibal, Le vray et methodique cours de la physique resolutive, vulgairements dite chymie, 1657

Our copy has been digitized and is available in full via the HathiTrust Digital Library.

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Barlet, Annibal, Le vray et methodique cours de la physique resolutive, vulgairements dite chymie, 1657

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Barlet, Annibal, Le vray et methodique cours de la physique resolutive, vulgairements dite chymie, 1657

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Barlet, Annibal, Le vray et methodique cours de la physique resolutive, vulgairements dite chymie, 1657

 

New Volunteer in Archives

Henry_Mac_2015Please join me in welcoming our new volunteer, Henry Mac. He was born and still resides in San Francisco. Currently, he is in his last year of studies for the Master of Library and Information Science degree with concentration in Archival Science at San Jose State University, School of Library and Information Science. Henry holds a bachelor’s degree in History from San Francisco State University. Henry has a very busy work schedule: he is an Archives Intern (Pathways Program) at the National Archives and Records Administration (NARA) at San Francisco and also an employee of several city libraries including San Francisco Public and San Mateo Public Library in the circulation department. In the last few years he conducted archival project work for the National Park Service at Yellowstone National Park and interned for the SFO Museum’s registration department.

His main objective for the UCSF volunteer internship is to gain on the job experience through project work and learn new techniques and processes from experienced archival staff. This position will allow him to gain exposure to the inner workings of an academic archive. In his application Henry mentioned that he “hopes to aid the staff in unearthing historical information that can be valuable to students, faculty and researchers at UCSF.”

When not at school or work, Henry likes to travel and collect antique furniture.

Henry will continue the project started by a previous intern and work on the inventory of biographical files. He will also process smaller collections and assist with digitization of images and documents chronicling the history of UCSF.